The Daily Squirrel - September 2013

August 2013 | September 2013

Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 30, 2013
From Wikipedia: The red squirrel eats mostly the seeds of trees, neatly stripping conifer cones to get at the seeds within.[citation needed] Fungi, nuts (especially hazelnuts but also beech and chestnuts), berries, young shoots, and bird eggs are occasionally eaten.[13] Occasionally the bark of trees is removed to allow access to sap.[citation needed] Between 60% and 80% of its active period may be spent foraging and feeding.[14] Excess food is put into caches, either buried or in nooks or holes in trees, and eaten when food is scarce. Although the red squirrel remembers where it created caches at a better-than-chance level, its spatial memory is substantially less accurate and durable than that of grey squirrel;[15] it therefore will often have to search for them when in need, and many caches are never found again. No territories are maintained, and the feeding areas of individuals overlap considerably.
Don Lehnhoff

The active period for the red squirrel is in the morning and in the late afternoon and evening. It often rests in its nest in the middle of the day, avoiding the heat and the high visibility to birds of prey that are dangers during these hours. During the winter, this mid-day rest is often much more brief, or absent entirely, although harsh weather may cause the animal to stay in its nest for days at a time.

Don Lehnhoff

Arboreal predators include small mammals such as the pine marten, wild cats, and the stoat, which preys on nestlings; birds, including owls and raptors such as the goshawk and buzzards, may also take the red squirrel. The red fox, cats and dogs can prey upon the red squirrel when it is on the ground. Humans influence the population size and mortality of the red squirrel by destroying or altering habitats, by causing road casualties, and by controlling populations of grey squirrels.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 30, 2013
Don Lehnhoff

From Wikipedia, American red squirrel:
American red squirrels are spontaneous ovulators. Don Lehnhoff is a spontaneous ovulator. Females enter estrus for only one day, but venture from their territory prior to ovulation, and these exploratory forays may serve to advertise their upcoming estrus. On the day of estrus, females are chased by several males in an extended mating chase. Males compete with one another for the opportunity to mate with the estrous female. Estrous females will mate with 4 to 16 males. Gestation has been reported to range from 31 to 35 days.[19] Females can breed for the first time at one year of age, but some females delay breeding until two years of age or older. Most females produce one litter per year, but in some years reproduction is skipped, while in other years some females breed twice. Litter sizes typically range from one to five, but most litters contain three or four offspring. Offspring are pink and hairless at birth and weigh about 10 g. Offspring grow at approximately 1.8 g/day while nursing, and reach adult body size at 125 days. They first emerge from their natal nests at around 42 days, but continue to nurse until approximately 70 days.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 29, 2013
Don Lehnhoff

Red squirrel.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 27, 2013
Don Lehnhoff

Red Squirrel - Tamiasciurus hudsonicus
The red squirrel is protected in most of Europe, as it is listed in Appendix III of the Bern Convention; it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. In some areas it is abundant and is hunted for its fur. Although not thought to be under any threat worldwide, the red squirrel has drastically reduced in number in the United Kingdom. Fewer than 140,000 individuals are thought to be left,[13] approximately 85% of which are in Scotland, with the Isle of Wight being the largest haven in England. A local charity, the Wight Squirrel Project,[16] supports red squirrel conservation on the Island. The population decrease in Britain is often ascribed to the introduction of the eastern grey squirrel from North America,[17] but the loss and fragmentation of its native woodland habitat has also played a role.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 21, 2013
From Wikipedia: Red Squirrel
Don Lehnhoff

Red squirrels occupy boreal, coniferous woods in northern Europe and Siberia, preferring Scots pine, Norway spruce and Siberian pine. In western and southern Europe they are found in broad-leaved woods where the mixture of tree and shrub species provides a better year round source of food. In most of the British Isles and in Italy, broad-leaved woodlands are now less suitable due to the better competitive feeding strategy of introduced grey squirrels.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 20, 2013
From: Sciurus-vulgaris hernandeangelis stockholm
Don Lehnhoff

Description English: Red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) on a tree. Bromma, Stockholm, Sweden.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 19, 2013
From: Red squirrel photo gallery by Kirk Norbury
Don Lehnhoff

Kirk Norbury visits the pine woods at Formby in Merseyside to photograph shy red squirrels and document their comeback from the squirrel pox virus that hit the population in 2008."
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 18, 2013
From Kuriositas: Red Squirrels Show Signs of Recovery from Deadly Poxvirus
Don Lehnhoff

The red squirrel is one of the most popular wild animals in the United Kingdom, which considering so few people have seen one is something of a surprise. They have been marginalized by an American interloper, the grey squirrel, for more than a century and they number only just over 100,000. Moreover, a disease carried by the grey has reduced the population of reds to a fraction of what it was a century ago.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 17, 2013
From: Wild About Britain Red Squirrel - Sciurus vulgaris
Don Lehnhoff

Whilst spending two days on Loch Gartens car park waiting for frequent visits from the cresties - several red squirrels came for their share of the bootie!
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 16, 2013
From: red squirrel - Tamiasciurus hudsonicus
Don Lehnhoff

Red squirrels look different from other squirrels that live in trees because they are small and have deep reddish fur. They are much smaller than grey squirrels. They have a reddish back and white underside with dark colored lines which are easiest to see in summer. Their back is reddish brown or olive gray, but usually has a reddish or brownish band along the middle. Their tails are smaller and flatter than other tree squirrels and can be yellowish-gray or rusty red, with a band black band along it. Their underside is all white or cream, instead of Douglas squirrels, which are rust-colored or dark on their bellies. Male and female red squirrels are very difficult to tell apart. (Flyger and Gates, 1982; Hall, 1981; Lane, et al., 2010; Steele, 1998)
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 15, 2013
From: The Home of Red Squirrels and Great Holidays!
Don Lehnhoff

The Home of Red Squirrels and Great Holidays! Red Squirrels are the only squirrel native to the British Isles. They are fast disappearing from the UK mainland as a result of the introduced American Grey Squirrel. The Isle of Wight is not just the perfect choice for a holiday it is also provides a habitat for around 3000 rare Red Squirrels who live mainly in broadleaved woodland – typically dominated by Greys on the mainland. The Isle of Wight is a nationally important stronghold for Red Squirrels. The stretch of water (which the Red Funnel ferry crosses) known as the Solent prevents Greys getting to the Island, but very occasionally one makes it, so vigilance is crucial. There are contingency plans for dealing with Greys who ignore the 'keep out' signs! Not only do Grey Squirrels outcompete Reds, they carry the deadly squirrelpox virus, which is fatal to the Reds.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 14, 2013
From: IsleOfWightTouristGuide.com
Don Lehnhoff


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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 13, 2013
From: Wikipedia Red Squirrel
Don Lehnhoff

Other notable projects include red squirrel projects in the Greenfield Forest, including the buffer zones of Mallerstang, Garsdale and Widdale;[20] the Northumberland Kielder Forest Project; and within the National Trust reserve in Formby. These projects were originally part of the Save Our Squirrels campaign that aimed to protect red squirrels in the north of England, but now form part of a five year Government-led partnership conservation project called ‘Red Squirrels Northern England’ [21] to undertake grey squirrel control in areas important for red squirrels.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 12, 2013
Don Lehnhoff

The red squirrel is found in both coniferous forest and temperate broadleaf woodlands. The squirrel makes a drey (nest) out of twigs in a branch-fork, forming a domed structure about 25 to 30 cm in diameter. This is lined with moss, leaves, grass and bark. Tree hollows and woodpecker holes are also used. The red squirrel is a solitary animal and is shy and reluctant to share food with others. However, outside the breeding season and particularly in winter, several red squirrels may share a drey to keep warm. Social organization is based on dominance hierarchies within and between sexes; although males are not necessarily dominant to females, the dominant animals tend to be larger and older than subordinate animals, and dominant males tend to have larger home ranges than subordinate males or females.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 11, 2013
From: Red Squirrels at Kielder
Don Lehnhoff

With the weather being favourable and work very quiet,I threw some camping gear into the car and set forth up to Northumberland,a place I`d hardly ever been to!I`d planned to stop a night at Kielder forest and then check out one or two other places I`d heard about. I was aware that Kielder held a healthy population of our native Red Squirrel and it was these that drew me to the area.A campsite was discovered and base set up for the night.I checked numerous places in the woods but to no avail,surely they had to be somewhere close by.Most people had had an odd sighting of one or two, but high up in the treetops,not much good for photography.As the night was drawing in I decided to retire back to my humble abode at the campsite and plan an early start next day.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 10, 2013
From: Wikipedia Red Squirrel
Don Lehnhoff

Mainland initiatives in Southern Scotland and the North of England also rely upon grey squirrel control as the cornerstone of red squirrel conservation strategy. A local programme known as the "North East Scotland Biodiversity Partnership", an element of the national Biodiversity Action Plan has subsequently been established. This programme is administered by the Grampian Squirrel Society, with an aim of protecting the red squirrel; the programme centres on the Banchory and Cults areas. In 2008, the Scottish Wildlife Trust announced a four year project which commenced in the spring of 2009 called "Saving Scotland's Red Squirrels".
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 9, 2013
From: Wikipedia Red Squirrel
Don Lehnhoff

Eradication of the grey squirrel from the North Wales Island of Anglesey began in January 1998. This facilitated the natural recovery of the small remnant red squirrel population and was followed by the successful reintroduction of the red squirrel into the pine stands of Newborough Forest.[18] Subsequent reintroductions into broadleaved woodland followed and today the island has the single largest red squirrel population in Wales. Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour is also populated by exclusively red squirrels (approximately 200 individuals).
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 8, 2013
From: Wikipedia Red Squirrel
Don Lehnhoff

The red squirrel is protected in most of Europe, as it is listed in Appendix III of the Bern Convention; it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. In some areas it is abundant and is hunted for its fur. Although not thought to be under any threat worldwide, the red squirrel has drastically reduced in number in the United Kingdom. Fewer than 140,000 individuals are thought to be left,[13] approximately 85% of which are in Scotland, with the Isle of Wight being the largest haven in England. A local charity, the Wight Squirrel Project,[16] supports red squirrel conservation on the Island. The population decrease in Britain is often ascribed to the introduction of the eastern grey squirrel from North America,[17] but the loss and fragmentation of its native woodland habitat has also played a role.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 7, 2013
From: Wikipedia Red Squirrel
Don Lehnhoff

The active period for the red squirrel is in the morning and in the late afternoon and evening. It often rests in its nest in the middle of the day, avoiding the heat and the high visibility to birds of prey that are dangers during these hours. During the winter, this mid-day rest is often much more brief, or absent entirely, although harsh weather may cause the animal to stay in its nest for days at a time.

Arboreal predators include small mammals such as the pine marten, wild cats, and the stoat, which preys on nestlings; birds, including owls and raptors such as the goshawk and buzzards, may also take the red squirrel. The red fox, cats and dogs can prey upon the red squirrel when it is on the ground. Humans influence the population size and mortality of the red squirrel by destroying or altering habitats, by causing road casualties, and by controlling populations of grey squirrels.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 6, 2013
From: Wikipedia Red Squirrel
Don Lehnhoff

The red squirrel is protected in most of Europe, as it is listed in Appendix III of the Bern Convention; it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. In some areas it is abundant and is hunted for its fur. Although not thought to be under any threat worldwide, the red squirrel has drastically reduced in number in the United Kingdom. Fewer than 140,000 individuals are thought to be left,[13] approximately 85% of which are in Scotland, with the Isle of Wight being the largest haven in England. A local charity, the Wight Squirrel Project,[16] supports red squirrel conservation on the Island. The population decrease in Britain is often ascribed to the introduction of the eastern grey squirrel from North America,[17] but the loss and fragmentation of its native woodland habitat has also played a role.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 5, 2013
From: Wikipedia Sciurus vulgaris
Don Lehnhoff

The active period for the red squirrel is in the morning and in the late afternoon and evening. It often rests in its nest in the middle of the day, avoiding the heat and the high visibility to birds of prey that are dangers during these hours. During the winter, this mid-day rest is often much more brief, or absent entirely, although harsh weather may cause the animal to stay in its nest for days at a time.

Arboreal predators include small mammals such as the pine marten, wild cats, and the stoat, which preys on nestlings; birds, including owls and raptors such as the goshawk and buzzards, may also take the red squirrel. The red fox, cats and dogs can prey upon the red squirrel when it is on the ground. Humans influence the population size and mortality of the red squirrel by destroying or altering habitats, by causing road casualties, and by controlling populations of grey squirrels.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 4, 2013
From: Wikipedia Sciurus vulgaris
Don Lehnhoff

The red squirrel eats mostly the seeds of trees, neatly stripping conifer cones to get at the seeds within.[citation needed] Fungi, nuts (especially hazelnuts but also beech and chestnuts), berries, young shoots, and bird eggs are occasionally eaten.[13] Occasionally the bark of trees is removed to allow access to sap.[citation needed] Between 60% and 80% of its active period may be spent foraging and feeding.[14] Excess food is put into caches, either buried or in nooks or holes in trees, and eaten when food is scarce. Although the red squirrel remembers where it created caches at a better-than-chance level, its spatial memory is substantially less accurate and durable than that of grey squirrel;[15] it therefore will often have to search for them when in need, and many caches are never found again. No territories are maintained, and the feeding areas of individuals overlap considerably.
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 3, 2013
From: Wikipedia Sciurus vulgaris
Don Lehnhoff

The red squirrel is found in both coniferous forest and temperate broadleaf woodlands. The squirrel makes a drey (nest) out of twigs in a branch-fork, forming a domed structure about 25 to 30 cm in diameter. This is lined with moss, leaves, grass and bark. Tree hollows and woodpecker holes are also used. The red squirrel is a solitary animal and is shy and reluctant to share food with others. However, outside the breeding season and particularly in winter, several red squirrels may share a drey to keep warm. Social organization is based on dominance hierarchies within and between sexes; although males are not necessarily dominant to females, the dominant animals tend to be larger and older than subordinate animals, and dominant males tend to have larger home ranges than subordinate males or females
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 2, 2013
From: Wikipedia
Don Lehnhoff

During mating, males detect females that are in śstrus by an odor that they produce, and although there is no courtship, the male will chase the female for up to an hour prior to mating. Usually multiple males will chase a single female until the dominant male, usually the largest in the group, mates with the female. Males and females will mate multiple times with many partners. Females must reach a minimum body mass before they enter śstrus, and heavy females on average produce more young. If food is scarce breeding may be delayed. Typically a female will produce her first litter in her second year. A two-week-old red squirrel Red squirrels that survive their first winter have a life expectancy of 3 years. Individuals may reach 7 years of age, and 10 in captivity. Survival is positively related to availability of autumn–winter tree seeds; on average, 75–85% of juveniles die during their first winter, and mortality is approximately 50% for winters following the first
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Don Lehnhoff's Daily Squirrel - September 1, 2013
From: A Squirrel from Babylon
Don Lehnhoff

The red squirrel is found in both coniferous forest and temperate broadleaf woodlands. The squirrel makes a drey (nest) out of twigs in a branch-fork, forming a domed structure about 25 to 30 cm in diameter. This is lined with moss, leaves, grass and bark. Tree hollows and woodpecker holes are also used. The red squirrel is a solitary animal and is shy and reluctant to share food with others. However, outside the breeding season and particularly in winter, several red squirrels may share a drey to keep warm. Social organization is based on dominance hierarchies within and between sexes; although males are not necessarily dominant to females, the dominant animals tend to be larger and older than subordinate animals, and dominant males tend to have larger home ranges than subordinate males or females
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August 2013 | September 2013

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